Diane Slocum

About Diane Slocum

Diane Slocum has been a newspaper reporter and editor and authored a historical book. As a freelance writer, she regularly contributes to magazines and newspapers. She writes features on authors and a column for writers and readers in Lifestyle magazine. She is assigned to write interviews of first-time novelists and bestselling authors for Authorlink.

Insights Into Diane

If I were to pick one type of book that I most like to read it would probably be historical novels. I appreciate the research that goes into recreating a world from our past and populating it with characters both historical and fictional.
I don’t really have a favorite author. Since I’m usually reading debut authors for my interviews, I rarely have repeats. Maybe that is also my reading quirk. The same way I dish up my plate at a potluck – take a little taste of everything.

The first peeve that comes to mind about the writing world is form rejections that say “It’s not right for us at this time.” I know agents, editors, etc. are overwhelmed with reading submissions, but something triggered the rejection. I would rather get a rejection that said “boring,” “weak lead,” “got to page 2,” than “it’s not right for us at this time.” Of course, I would hope that the reader really did think it was brilliant but just not what she needed then, but then one word to say why, what was in her mind, would help.
What foods do I like? As I said, I sample everything at a potluck. Maybe fruit? I live in Fresno County. We grow almost everything. Fresh and local is the best. My food quirk is probably raw potatoes. I could be lured into a trap by a trail of raw potato slices. So far, I’ve never enjoyed tasting liver or kidneys. I also don’t want to eat food that should be accompanied by a fire hose because it’s spicy hot.
In my leisure time, I go camping and hiking. I keep a journal. I watch TV shows like Poldark, Victoria and Mercy Street. I run, but that’s not exactly leisure, neither is growing my vegetables. And, of course, I read.
Of all the people in the world, who I would most like to have dinner with, is another hard choice. But right now, I’ll choose Jimmy Carter. I have great respect for his character and all he does to help people, even continuing into his very advanced years.

Author Archives for Diane Slocum

Taiye Selasi Discusses Retying the Family

April 26, 2013 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Taiye Selasi Discusses Retying the Family

Renowned surgeon, failed husband and father Kweku Sai stumbles out of his home in Ghana one morning and dies. Years earlier, he had walked out of his family home in America and never returned. His estranged wife and now grown children have each dealt with his abandonment in their own private way and it has taken a toll on their lives.


y by Marjorie Celona

Why Y? by Marjorie Celona

April 1, 2013 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Why Y? by Marjorie Celona

A baby is abandoned on the doorstep of the YMCA. She becomes Shannon as she passes through foster homes where she is sometimes abused or neglected. Her life turns for the better when she is adopted by Miranda, a single mother raising another daughter. But she still never quite feels as if she fits in.


Their Souls in Letters – An Interview with Carlene Bauer

February 26, 2013 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Their Souls in Letters – An Interview with Carlene Bauer

In Carlene Bauer's debut novel, Frances and Bernard meet at an artists’ colony. Though very different in temperament, they continue their friendship through letters and occasional visits. They discuss their faith, their families and their feelings. As the intensity of their relationship grows, from 1957 to 1968, and their writing careers develop, so does the difficulty in maintaining their lives and their sanity.


Michael Dahlie Discusses Goats, Guns and Ghostwriting

January 27, 2013 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Michael Dahlie Discusses Goats, Guns and Ghostwriting

In Michael Dahlie’s second novel, The Best of Youth, Henry Lang is trying to find his way in life after his parents die and leave him 15 million dollars. Henry is not quite sure how to handle much of anything including his fourth cousin Abby, a million-dollar herd of heirloom goats and some inherited pistols.


Paddling Troubled Waters with Ben Schrank

December 19, 2012 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Paddling Troubled Waters with Ben Schrank

Ben Schrank’s third novel, Love Is a Canoe, taps into his knowledge of the publishing world. At age 23, Peter Herman wrote a book on marriage based on what he learned during the summer he spent with his grandparents when he was 13. On the fiftieth anniversary of that summer, Stella Petrovic conceives a contest to promote the book by giving the winning couple a visit with Peter.


David R. Gillham’s Book About Survival on the Homefront

October 28, 2012 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on David R. Gillham’s Book About Survival on the Homefront

Sigrid Schröder has an office job in World War II Berlin, a live-in mother-in-law and a husband on the eastern front. She also has a Jewish lover and a secretive young neighbor who needs help evading police inquiry. Daily life with rationing and British bombing raids is hard enough before Sigrid gets dangerously drawn into the lives of people who rarely are quite what they seem to be.


Sandi Tan Envisions an Island of Ghosts

September 27, 2012 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Sandi Tan Envisions an Island of Ghosts

Ling (later named “Cassandra”) sees ghosts. As a child, she moves from Shanghai to The Black Isle, where she grows up through colonialism, war and independence, all the while aware of the haunted souls that share the island with the living. Her struggles take her from poverty to comfort to the horrors of wartime occupation in this debut novel by Sandi Tan.


Going Home with Gregory Hill

July 29, 2012 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Going Home with Gregory Hill

In Gregory Hill’s award-winning debut novel, Shakespeare Williams returns to his family farm to bury a dead cat. He finds his father’s mental state and the farm have deteriorated alarmingly so he stays on and tries to rebuild. He hooks up with former schoolmates whose lives have stagnated and together they bungle their way toward a get-rich and get-revenge plan.


Stephen Dau’s Buried Memories

June 27, 2012 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on Stephen Dau’s Buried Memories

Younis and Christopher share a cave in the mountains above a destroyed village. Younis is a teenage refugee from the village. Christopher is an American soldier. Christopher treats Younis’ wounds and writes in his journal. Younis changes his name to Jonas and comes to America. Christopher doesn’t return. While Jonas tries to adapt to life in the United States, his memories keep returning him to those last days in his homeland. The memories are incomplete as he shares them with his counselor, Paul, but he can’t escape them. And he can’t escape the connection he had with Christopher.


David Lyons Plays with Ice that Burns

May 27, 2012 12:00 am Published by Comments Off on David Lyons Plays with Ice that Burns

Jock Boucher is no sooner appointed a U.S. District Judge than he has to take over the caseload of an ailing senior judge and immediately steps into a 20-year-old case of corruption, murder and intrigue. Scientist Bob Palmetto and lawyer Ruth Kalin emerge from hiding long enough to entangle Boucher in the race for undersea methane hydrate – a volatile and dangerous, but extremely valuable new source of energy. Some will stop at nothing to get it, including murdering anyone who gets in their way, even a federal judge or two.