Interviews

Emily Bestler, Vice President and Executive Editorial Director Pocket Books

August 20, 2001 7:30 pm By

Emily Bestler learned early to love books. "When I started reading, I was doing something everybody else in the family did," she said. "It's what we did together as a family." It's a tradition she's passing along to her three children - girls 9 and 8 and a boy, 4. They want to be writers when they grow up, though, not an editor like mom.

An Exclusive Authorlink Interview With Author John Connolly

July 1, 2001 12:00 am By

John Connolly is the author of Dark Hollow. Private detective Charlie Parker finds himself hunting a mythical killer through the forests of Maine in winter, decades after his own grandfather tried to find and capture the same killer. (Simon & Schuster, July 2001).

An Exclusive Authorlink Interview With Author David Ebershoff

May 1, 2001 12:00 am By

David Ebershoff is author of The Rose City, a collection of seven short stories about men and boys forging their way in a chaotic world (Viking; Weidenfeld & Nicholson in the UK, May 2001). David also is publishing director for The Modern Library , an imprint of Random House.

An Exclusive Authorlink Interview With Novelist Neal Bowers

April 15, 2001 12:00 am By

Novelist Neal Bowers' latest work, Loose Ends (Random House, Spring 2001), is a darkly funny tale whose style and wit mark the debut of a very special writer. Here he talks candidly to aspiring Authorlink writers about his career as an author published by a major house.

An Exclusive Authorlink Interview With Author Julie Salamon

March 15, 2001 12:00 am By

Julie Salamon is an author, journalist and critic whose books include The Devil's Candy (a national bestseller), The Net of Dreams, White Lies, and The Christmas Tree--a New York Times bestseller. She is now a television critic for The New York Times. Her latest book, Facing the Wind, A True Story of Tragedy and Reconciliation (click to order via Amazon.com), will be released by Random House in April, 2001.

David Ebershoff: What the Classics Teach Writers And Editors Today

December 1, 2000 12:00 am By

The two most important things a writer needs to do to improve his or her craft are to write a lot, and read a lot. Reading the classics is an important step every writer needs to take as he or she refines their skills. It is important to know what precedes him or her as a writer, who has written what. Writers can learn the basics of style and plot and storyline from the classics, even writers whose style is not at all classical.