Kate Padilla

About Kate Padilla

Kate Padilla has long enjoyed reading, and for the last decade, combined her writing skills and book pleasure to review books for Authorlink.

Kate’s journalism career began in high school with a weekly column in her hometown newspaper, and later, after graduating from the University of Wyoming, she moved into newspapers as a reporter and editor and also as a radio news director. She subsequently worked as a U.S. Senate staffer helping write legislation and then as a public lands manager for the Department of Interior until her retirement. Now, she is an award-winning poet, artist and writer living in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her passion is exploring, traveling to places not often frequented by tourists, ranging from Albania in the Balkans to isolated Honduran islands in the Caribbean.

Not surprisingly Kate favors foreign authors because they immerse her in other worlds and cultures, books such as those written by Nobel Prize winner Naguib Mahfouz, who writes about the Arab world, or Milan Kundera, from Czechoslovakia. Any book written by women with Latin or Mexican roots is a must, she says, listing authors Isabel Allende and Sandra Cisneros as idols. She never passes up a poetry book sent her way, though they are a challenge to review because the poetry is subjective. She also enjoys a good detective novel, and at times, magical fanaticism. Her review favorites include offerings from the Library of America, a nonprofit that collects and preserves writings from America’s key authors. If she had a genre she doesn’t prefer, it would likely be most Western novels. Her pet peeves are preachy religious or moralizing books, those that demean women or have disregard for the environment.

Author Archives for Kate Padilla

Vonnegut Novels 1987 - 1997

Vonnegut Novels 1987 – 1997 Edited by Sidney Offit

March 17, 2016 7:23 pm Published by Comments Off on Vonnegut Novels 1987 – 1997 Edited by Sidney Offit

Vonnegut Novels 1987 - 1997, Sidney Offit Editor, Library of America - Kurt Vonnegut’s final three novels, written in the late 1980s and early 1990s and released in a single volume by the Library of America, feature his bold futurist and darkly pessimistic views laced with blunt humor.


Happy People Read and Drink Coffee

Happy People Read and Drink Coffee by Agnes Martin-Lugand

January 21, 2016 11:13 am Published by Comments Off on Happy People Read and Drink Coffee by Agnes Martin-Lugand

Happy People Read and Drink Coffee, Agnés Martin-Lugand, Weinstein Books 2016 Translation -- The French novel, “Happy People Read and Drink Coffee,” by Agnés Martin-Lugand, chronicles Diane’s life-journey from extreme suffering after her husband Colin and daughter Clara were killed when a truck crashed into their car, to survival.


The Word Game by Steena Holmes

The Word Game by Steena Holmes

December 11, 2015 12:33 pm Published by Comments Off on The Word Game by Steena Holmes

The Word Game, Steena Holmes, Lake Union --Steena Holmes’s poignant novel, “The Word Game,” focuses on the struggles an adult experiences when they suspect child sexual abuse and how the allegation is handled by the professionals.


The Two Family House by Lynda Cohen Loigman

The Two-Family House by Lynda Cohen Loigman

December 7, 2015 12:18 pm Published by Comments Off on The Two-Family House by Lynda Cohen Loigman

The Two-Family Hous, Lynda Cohen Loigman, St. Martin’s Press 2015-Prepare to suspend any sense of reality when reading Lynda Cohen Loigman’s debut novel, “The Two-Family House,” a family saga set in Brooklyn in 1947.


Nagasaki Life After Nuclear Wat

NAGASAKI Life After Nuclear War by Susan Southard

December 2, 2015 2:35 pm Published by Comments Off on NAGASAKI Life After Nuclear War by Susan Southard

NAGASAKI Life After Nuclear Ward, Susan Southard, Viking --Susan Southard’s decade-plus of research and collected eyewitness accounts in “Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War” is chilling, and prompts rethinking the United States’ true motive for dropping a nuclear bomb on Nagasaki,


The Girl Who Buried Her Dreams in a Can

The Girl who Buried her Dreams in a Can by Dr. Tererai Trent

November 12, 2015 9:38 am Published by Comments Off on The Girl who Buried her Dreams in a Can by Dr. Tererai Trent

The Girl who Buried her Dreams in a Can, Dr. Tererai Trent, Viking -- Dr. Tererai Trent, in her personal story, tells in an inspirational children’s story how she overcame punishing obstacles to fulfill her dream of being educated.


Lovers on All Stains' Day by Juan Gabriel Vasquez

Lovers on All Saints’ Day by Juan Gabriel Vasquez

August 24, 2015 11:46 am Published by Comments Off on Lovers on All Saints’ Day by Juan Gabriel Vasquez

Lovers on All Saints Day , Juan Gabriel Vásquez, Riverhead Books -- These seven complex stories by Colombian Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s in “Lovers on All Saints’ Day” are haunting and indelible with masterful insight into love and loss. This English-translation collection was first published in Spanish 15 years ago and developed while Vásquez was in self-imposed exile in Belgium and France.


Music for Wartime by Rebecca Makkai

Music for Wartime by Rebecca Makkai

August 7, 2015 2:45 pm Published by Comments Off on Music for Wartime by Rebecca Makkai

Music for Wartime, Rebecca Makkai, Viking -- Rebecca Makkai offers readers a treasure trove of literary work in her collection of 17 short stories in “Music for Wartime,” an intriguing blend of artistic imaginativeness and her Romanian ancestry.


The Kindness by Polly Samson

The Kindness by Polly Samson

July 20, 2015 9:40 am Published by Comments Off on The Kindness by Polly Samson

The Kindness, Polly Samson, Bloomsbury Publishing 2015 -- British author Polly Samson’s “The Kindness,” is not a compelling novel but rather a dramatized, ages-old story about a love relationship gone bad. Like a fisherman dangling a worm, the author teases the reader with a promise of an intriguing story yet to come.


Lord Fear by Lucas Mann

Lord Fear by Lucas Mann

July 1, 2015 8:54 am Published by Comments Off on Lord Fear by Lucas Mann

Lord Fear, Lucas Mann, Pantheon -- Lucas Mann’s memoir, “Lord Fear,” takes a different twist: Rather than relating his own personal life, Mann collates fragments about his drug-addicted brother’s life from interviews with family and friends along with the brother’s journal entries to fashion a haunting narrative.