Kate Padilla

Kate Padilla

Kate Padilla is an author, poet and artist. Her book, Apples Rot on the Ground (May 2020), is a collection of gut-wrenching poems detailing the racism and bigotry that existed for Hispanic families in early New Mexico & Wyoming.
Review: The North Face of the Heart by Dolores Redondo

Review: The North Face of the Heart by Dolores Redondo

The North Face of the Heart, Dolores Redondo, – Spanish author Dolores Redondo’s wildly popular protagonist, Investigator Amaia Salazar, is back for another adventure in Redondo’s just-translated thriller, “The North Face of the Heart.” This time, Salazar assists the FBI to track down a serial killer.

Review: What Could Be Saved by Liese O’Halloran Schwarz

Review: What Could Be Saved by Liese O’Halloran Schwarz

What Could Be Saved, Liese O’Halloran Schwarz, Atria Books – The lingering quietness of Liese O’Halloran Schwarz’s mystery novel, “What Could Be Saved,” is also its driving energy. The narrative, bouncing between past and present, evolves around the disappearance of a child, and then, his re-appearance a half-century later.

Review: At the End of the Matinee by Kelichiro Hirano

Review: At the End of the Matinee by Kelichiro Hirano

At the End of the Matinee, Kelichiro Hirano, Amazon Crossing – “At the End of the Matinee,” Japanese author Keiichiro Hirano’s new novel, depicts a torturous and suspenseful journey of two people in love whose lives bisect at the exact moment they are prepared to unite. It’s like two trains passing, each going in opposite directions.

Review:  Always A Song by Ellen Harper

Review: Always A Song by Ellen Harper

Always A Song, Ellen Harper with Sam Barry, Chronicle Prism – Folk Singer Ellen Harper’s stirring memoir, “Always a Song,” begins with her birth, part of a musical family enjoying “fascist-free” post-World War II life in New Hampshire.

Review:  The Paris Apartment by Kelly Bowen

Review: The Paris Apartment by Kelly Bowen

The Paris Apartment, Kelly Bowen, Hachette – Kelly Bowen’s historical romance, “The Paris Apartment” interweaves the lives of two women during WWII with the efforts of a granddaughter and a grandnephew to uncover the women’s war role.

Review: Tears of Amber by Sofia Segovia

Review: Tears of Amber by Sofia Segovia

Tears of Amber. Sofia Segovia, Amazon Crossing – You may have vowed not to read yet another war novel on human suffering, but Mexican author Sofia Segovia’s new book will change your mind. Segovia’s compelling “Tears of Amber,” focuses on females — mothers, left alone with their children to navigate war horrors.

Review: The Truth and Other Hidden Things by Lea Geller

Review: The Truth and Other Hidden Things by Lea Geller

The Truth and Other Hidden Things, Lea Geller, Lake Union Publishing – Lea Geller’s, “The Truth and other Hidden Things,” portrays a desperate mother and housewife who becomes addicted to “likes” on her gossip column with a grandiose idea she will soon get a “book deal.”

Review: The Other Emily by Dean Koontz

Review: The Other Emily by Dean Koontz

The Other Emily, Dean Koontz, Thomas & Mercer – Dean Koontz’ forthcoming 2021 novel, “The Other Emily,” is so terrifying it’s impossible to set aside until the conclusion unfolds.

Review: Lana’s War by Anita Abriel

Review: Lana’s War by Anita Abriel

Lana’s War, Anita Abriel, Atria – Anita Abriel’s novel, Lana’s War, riffs on dark history, during a time of genocide of Jewish people by the Nazis during World War II. 

Review: Do No Harm by Christina McDonald

Review: Do No Harm by Christina McDonald

Review: Do No Harm, Christina McDonald, Gallery Books – Christina McDonald’s novel, “Do No Harm,” is a vexing story that pivots around parents who resort to nightmarish measures to fund medical treatment for their dying son.