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Vintage/Anchor Sends Science Writer on 19-City Tour for New Book, 1491

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August 24 – August 31, 2006 Edition

Vintage/Anchor Sends

Science Writer on 19-City

Tour for New Book, 1491

NEW YORK, NY/8/23/06—Vintage/Anchor/Random House is sending award-winning science writer Charles Mann on a 19-city author tour to promote the paperback release of his hit hardcover title, 1491.

The initial run for the soft cover release will be 100,000 copies. Mann’s hardcover release has about 175,000 copies in print at Knopf, also a Random House division.

Mann will be touring major cities in September and October.

In this groundbreaking work of science, history, and archaeology, Charles C. Mann radically alters our understanding of the Americas before the arrival of Columbus in 1492.

Contrary to what so many Americans learn in school, the pre-Columbian Indians were not sparsely settled in a pristine wilderness; rather, there were huge numbers of Indians who actively molded and influenced the land around them. From the astonishing Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán, which had running water, immaculately clean streets, and was larger than any contemporary European city, to the Mexican corn that was so carefully created in a specialized breeding process that it has been called man’s first feat of genetic engineering, Indians were not living lightly on the land but were landscaping and manipulating their world in ways that we are only now beginning to understand. Challenging and surprising, this is a transformative new look at a rich and fascinating world we only thought we knew.

Charles C. Mann is a correspondent for Science and The Atlantic Monthly, and has co-written four previous books including Noah’s Choice: The Future of Endangered Species and The Second Creation. A three-time National Magazine Award finalist, he has won awards from the American Bar Association, the Margaret Sanger Foundation, the American Institute of Physics, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, among others. His writing was selected for The Best American Science Writing 2003 and The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2003. He lives with his wife and their children in Amherst, Massachusetts.